Kilo Dialogues

Aurel von Richthofen speaks @ Kilo Dialogues Singapore curated by Ludovica Tomarchio 2015.
related: 

ISU, Braunschweig

Aurel von Richthofen speaks on the topic of Urbanisation Patterns at the Gulf of Arabia. Guest lecture at the Institute for Sustainable Urbanism [ISU] in Braunschweig, Dec. 2012, lecture in German.

Scitech TV - City

Scitech TV documents the research project sponsored by the Research Council Oman "Towards Sustainable Patterns of Urbanisation in Oman" conducted by GUtech and SQU a second time, featuring Aurel von Richthofen, Maryam Zargar Yaghoubi and Sebastian Langer as well as GUtech students.

The Atlantic - CityLab: Muscat

Muscat sits on the Gulf of Oman, where the rocky Hajar Mountains rise up behind the city, leaving only a narrow strip for building. This geography—combined with the fact that the favored architectural style is one of whitewashed, low-rise buildings—has created a city design with incredible lengthwise sprawl. The capital is physically the size of Los Angeles, but houses less than a quarter of that city’s population of 3.9 million. It’s a very low-density city.

Topos Journal: Desert Sprawl

Aurel writes in Topos, the International Review of Landscape, Architecture and Urban Design about landscape destruction in Oman due to rapid urbanization. The essay is accompagnied by a photo series and appears in two versions online 2014 and in print 2015.

Baumeister Journal: Oman - the Anti-Dubai?

Aurel writes about urbanisation trends and sustainability in Oman in Germany's oldest architecture magazine - Baumeister. The conservative development in Muscat is seen in contrast to fast paced Dubai. The specificities of urban sprawl, land allocation system, destruction of landscape are descrtibed as well as typical modern villas and sub-urban settlement patterns. The article concludes with a manifesto for sustainable urbanism adapted to Oman.

Arab Gulf Cities in Transition: Space, Politics and Society

The cities in the Arab Gulf are developing in a fast and unprecedented way. The vast majority of the growing population of the six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries are concentrated in these cities. While they are a focal point for immigration, they are unique spaces and places on various other levels, too: In many cases the Arab Gulf cities represent the exclusive political and economic centres of their countries; they consume a vast amount of energy; they have surpassed other Arab cities in their size and scale; their exponential growth is driven by diminishing fossil resources and, therefore, they have realised the urgent need to adopt sustainable development policies.